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Southwest Studies

Southwest Studies Website

Professor LEONARD (director); Associate Professor PERRAMOND; Assistant Professor GUERRA; Distinguished Lecturer and Legal Scholar-in-Residence KANNAN

Southwest Studies examines the region of the greater Southwest through a variety of lenses, encouraging students to see the complexity that diverse people have created in a specific place.  This blend of peoples and histories living in a distinctive landscape provides a model for study applicable to any region. Using the tools of traditional disciplines in combination with interdisciplinary techniques, students will learn to observe and analyze places and people and to use these skills to solve real problems.

Director and Major Advisor:  Professor Eric Leonard (Geology)

Faculty Advisors: Drossman (Environmental Science), Hecox (Environmental Science), Hilberry (English), Hilt (Physics), Kannan (Environmental Science), Hyde (History), Kelso (Biology), Leonard (Geology), Levine (Music), Linkhart (Biology), Monroy (History), Montaño (Anthropology), Padilla (English), Perramond (Southwest Studies and Environmental Science), Popkin (Sociology), Torres-Rouff (History), Tucker (Art).

Southwest Studies Visiting Faculty (2012-13): Beard, Crawford, and Guerra.

Major Requirements

A major in Southwest studies requires a minimum of 13.5 units and a maximum of 15 units.

  • Geography “core” course: (1 unit) SW272 Nature, Region, and Society of the Southwest.
  • Language: (2 units or 4 units) Spanish 201 or equivalent.
  • Two appropriate methods/theory courses: (2 units) (many of these have prerequisites), AN215; CO300; CO391; EN250; EV222; EV228; FG311; HY399; MU393; PS321; SO229; SW301 or others by petition.
  • Four (4) units of electives from Approved List: Students should choose electives that prepare them for their senior project. (See Program Advisors for Current List.)
  • Junior Seminar: SW395 Prerequisite: Southwest Studies major (or minor), junior standing, or consent of instructor. 1 unit.
  • Senior Capstone Project: SW400–401 Senior Capstone Project. Prerequisite: COI. 6 units in the major and approved methods course — 2 units (1 unit for SW400 and 1 unit for SW401).

Minor Requirements

A minor in Southwest studies requires a minimum of 7 or a maximum of 8 units including:

  • FYE/SW175 The American Southwest: An Introduction or SW272 Nature, Region, and Society of the Southwest.
  • Spanish 101 or equivalent (2 units).
  • Four (4) units of electives from approved list. (See program advisors for current list.)

Courses

Southwest Studies

SW100 Topics in Southwest Studies

Selected topics related to the Southwest, taught at an introductory level. Content will vary from course-to-course. (Not offered 2014-15).

.5 to 1 unit

SW102 Place, Space and the Southwest

Survey of the Greater Southwest, the power of place and overlapping cultural geographies of indigenous and European cultures in shaping the history, geography and landscapes of the region. Covers the pre-1492 Southwest, the Spanish conquest and colonial era, and tracks through the Mexican and Anglo-American periods of the Southwest. Considers modern controversies such as land and water use, border issues, environmental challenges, and the maintenance of cultural heritage. Prepares participants for further work in Southwest Studies and affiliated interdisciplinary programs. Some outdoor fieldwork. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW120 Mexican Folklorico Dance

Combines instruction in folkloric dance performance with analysis of authenticity, permissible artistic expression, cultural impact and historical distinctions of Mexican Folklorico dance since the beginning of the 20th century. Among the dance traditions studied are Pre-Colonial Danza, Danza, Folklorico and Ballet Folklorico. The class will present a dance performance at the end of the semester, and may perform in less formal events at other times during the semester. Open to all students. (Offered by the semester as an adjunct course.) No prerequisites. (Not offered 2014-15).

.25 unit

SW128 Introduction to Global Climate

(Not offered 2014-15).

1 to 2 units

SW130 World Music Ensemble

Mariachi Tigre de Colorado College. Instrumental and vocal performance of Mexican popular and folk orchestral music with emphasis on bel canto singing. Genres include regional sones, huapangos, corridos, boleros, canciones, rancheras, polcas, valses and cumbias. (Offered by the semester as an adjunct course.) No prerequisites. (Not offered 2014-15).

.25 to 2 units

SW131 Cultural Astronomy of the SW

Surveys the history and concepts of Western astronomy as background for other cultural approaches to astronomy. Focuses on archaeostronomy and ethnoastronomy of Native Southwestern peoples, including ancestral Puebloans as well as modern Pueblo and Athabascan tribes. Explores relationships among astronomy, rock art, ritual, oral narratives, social patterns and beliefs systems. (Meets the Critical Perspectives requirement and the laboratory/field requirement in the Natural Sciences.) (Also listed as AN 211.) No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World lab or field requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Quantitative Reasoning requirement.

Also listed as Physics 131.

1 unit — Hilt

SW141 Sustainable Development

Investigates the concept of sustainable development by first introducing students to necessary economic terms and concepts. It next explores traditional economic models of production and distribution. Finally it introduces the concept of sustainable development (meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs). The course includes fieldwork to explore the behavior of traditional economic models and examples of sustainable development. May involve additional expense. This course is intended for non-economics majors. No prerequisites. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW175 The American Southwest: An Introduction

An interdisciplinary and multicultural introduction to the Greater Southwest: its physical settings, histories, peoples, cultures, conflicting ethnic demands and common problems. By using a variety of materials that may include anthropological, artistic, geographical, historical, and literary approaches, the course examines the region we call the Greater Southwest over time and space, concluding with research into current concerns. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: The West in Time requirement.

Prerequisite: Freshmen Only.

2 units — Garcia, Guerra

SW181 Topics in Local and Regional Issues:

In cooperation with local and regional experts, Colorado College faculty and students will explore local and regional issues on a variety of topics. Combining theory with practice, students will work to develop long-term research projects in relationship with needs of groups in the Southwest. Taught in extended format. No Prerequisites (Not offered 2014-15).

.5 unit

SW183 Community Organizations in the Southwest

Provides students with community learning experiences through a local community organization. Students spend two hours per week working with the organization serving as tutor/mentors for children ages 6 through 12 who are at risk academically. Additional class sessions focus on concepts and theories related to community learning experience, such as race/ethnicity, critical pedagogy, community formation, intercultural dialogue, philanthropy, social justice and social movements. (Offered by the semester as an adjunct course.) No prerequisites. (Not offered 2014-15).

.5 unit

SW185 In Our Own Backyard: Social Justice in the Southwest

Examines the relationship between social, environmental, and political issues in the Southwest and choices we make personally and institutionally. Traces the resources, both human and natural , that make it possible to live in Colorado Springs and in a college community. Students will work in the field and in the library, developing data about the region. Finally we will consider modes of writing, speaking, data presentation that are essential to effect change. Full year extended format. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

1 unit — Rios

SW200 Topics in Southwest Studies:

Selected topics related to the Southwest, taught at an intermediate level. Content and prerequisites will vary from course-to-course.

Also listed as Education 250 and English 280 and Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and Environmental Science 261 and Feminist & Gender Studies 206 and General Studies 222 and History 200 and History 239 and Religion 200.

.5 or 1 unit — Crawford, Cucher, Drummond, Guerra

SW202 Field Botany

A field course involving collection, identification, and preservation of vascular plants, emphasizing evolution, ecology and biogeography. Takes advantage of the major ecosystems of the Pikes Peak region. (Meets the laboratory/field requirement for natural sciences.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World lab or field requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Biology 105.

1 unit

SW203 Field Zoology

A field course involving collection, identification, preservation, population studies, and life history studies of animals of regional ecosystems. Systematics, evolution, and biogeography are emphasized. (Meets the laboratory/field requirement for natural sciences.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World lab or field requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Biology 108 or 109 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

SW204 Prehistory: The Southwest

Human habitation of the Southwest from earliest times, with emphasis on human interaction with environment. Changes in cultural patterns over time. No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW208 Ecology

The analysis of distributions, abundances, and interrelationships of organisms. Populations, communities, and ecosystems are investigated, and implications for humans considered. Laboratory and field experience. (Meets the laboratory/field requirement for natural sciences.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Scientific Investigation of the Natural World lab or field requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Either 1.) 1 unit from Biology 105, 107,108,109, Geology 130 or 140 & Chemistry 107; or 2.) Environmental Science 112 & 155 with strong HS Biology; a college-level BY course strongly recommended.

1 unit

SW210 Environmental Chemistry

A focus on the thermodynamics and kinetics of pollutants in the air, water, and soil, as well as some toxicology. Statistical methods and the analysis of environmental samples using instrumental methods as well as techniques in chemical waste treatment are covered. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW212 Archaeological Geology

The application of concepts and techniques of geoscience and other disciplines to archaeology to help solve ancient dilemmas. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW214 History of Native America

Introduces students to the history of native peoples primarily in North America. The course includes histories of individual native groups as well as the relationship between American Indians and a variety of Europeans from before contact until the present. Examines a variety of primary and secondary materials to see patterns in the ways that Native Americans have been affected by the process of conquest, the ways in which Anglo-Europeans have responded to Native Americans, and in the ways in which American Indians have become a part of and remained apart from 'mainstream' American culture. As a broader goal, we also look at the way 'history' is made, understood, and used by very different cultural traditions. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW217 American Frontiers

Also listed as History 217.

1 unit — Hyde

SW220 Environmental Justice in the SW

Conflicts and commonalities between practicing environmentalists (pastoral cultures of New Mexico and southern Colorado) and card-carrying environmentalists. Course topics include historic, economic, and social origins of conflicts between these rural cultures and urban environmentalists and today's response by pastoral cultures to re-create equitable economies that sustain environment and culture. Field trip to New Mexico and southern Colorado. (Meets the Critical Perspective Requirement.) Writing emphasis. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW228 Environmental Law of the Southwest

Surveys the major environmental laws, and the landmark court decisions interpreting them that affect environmental policy in the Southwest. Topics include mining, grazing, forests, water, Native Americans, and wildlife. (Also listed as PS 203.) No Prerequisites. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW230 Native Americans Under Federal Law

The most influential external force that has shaped the status and culture of contemporary Native Americans has been federal law. The course examines these laws and Supreme Court decisions that led to the forced removal of Native Americans, established trustee doctrine, imposed assimilation policy, allocated land and natural resources, and changed the system of government for Native American tribes. We consider current efforts by Native Americans to enforce the laws that were enacted to protect their interests but which have been ignored for centuries. Focus is in the Southwest including current litigation over water rights in Colorado, land in New Mexico, and hunting and fishing rights in much of the region. No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW237 Latino Immigration and Urban Change

(Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW239 History of Mexico

1 unit

SW242 The Anthropology of Food (with emphasis on writing)

This course will explore food concepts, analytical methods, and the food habits of different ethnic groups. The class will have a field trip to the San Luis Valley, and to Northern New Mexico to document the production of food among farmers, cattle ranchers, and restauranteurs. (Limited to 12 students.) No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW243 Hispanic Folklore of the Southwest (with emphasis on writing)

This course is designed to introduce students to several approaches in folklore studies and to Mexican material culture, religion, music, and prose narratives in the Southwest region of the United States. We will examine how the different approaches used by historians, literary critics, anthropologists, and folklorists can enhance the study of Hispanic folklore and material culture. (Limited to 12 students.) No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW250 Regional Studies:

(Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW253 Literature of the American Southwest: Contemporary Poets

This course will examine the work of poets living in or writing about the Southwest, including but not limited to poetry that grows out of the three major cultural traditions of the Southwest-Native American, Anglo, and Latino. Students will have the opportunity to write poems as well as to analyze poetry. No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

Also listed as Comparative Literature 200 and English 280 and Race and Ethnic Studies 200.

1 unit — Cucher

SW257 Globalization and Immigration on the U.S.-Mexican Border

The current era of globalization has generated the apparent contradiction between the free flow of capital across borders and restrictive immigration policy. The course examines these trends as they apply to the U. S. -Mexican border region and will consider issues such as the following: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the multifaceted nature of integration between US and Mexican economies, the increase in low wage jobs in the US economy requiring higher levels of Latino immigration, economic development in Mexico that has generated emigration to the US, and US and Mexican immigration policies including the militarization of the U. S. -Mexican border. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW258 Native Peoples of the Southwest

Provides the fundamental building blocks to understanding the distinctive differences between the major Native Nations of the Southwest including language and culture, respective colonization and resistance experiences, identity and cultural vitality, gender and social roles, and expressive culture and representation. Readings may include ethnographic, ethno-historical, biographical, and linguistic works, as well as critiques of the study of Native peoples by Native scholars. Field Trip Possible. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW265 Immigrant Communities in Colorado

The changing demographics of the Front Range communities in Colorado and the socio-economic conditions that generate poverty will be examined as a case study of immigration theory. The increasing diversity of Colorado Springs, Denver, and Pueblo, due in part to high levels of immigration from Mexico, creates new challenges for this region including the provision of adequate housing and social services and racial and ethnic integration in public schools and other institutions. This community based learning course offers students the opportunity to volunteer with a non-profit organization serving Latino immigrants in one of these cities. Particular emphasis will be placed on student teaching of English as a Second Language classes to recently arrived immigrants. Offered as a combined half block and spring semester extended format course; students must complete both the half block and the spring semester work to receive credit for either. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Spanish Language skills recommended.

.5 unit

SW267 History of the Southwest under Spain and Mexico

The pre-contact history of Anasazi and Athabascan peoples from anthropological and mythological perspectives; the causes and consequences of the Spanish entrada and attempts at missionization of the Indian peoples of New Mexico and the California coast; development of mestizo society; the arrival of the Anglo-Americans and the Mexican-American War. No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 267 and History 267.

1 unit — Monroy

SW268 History of the Southwest since the Mexican War

The adaptation of Native American and Hispanic peoples to Anglo-American culture and politics; the causes and consequences of the loss of Hispanic lands; the evolution of family life and religious practices; indigenous views of modernity. Films, artistic expressions, and works of fiction as well as historical sources. No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW272 Nature, Region and Society of the Southwest

Social and natural science methodological frameworks and approaches to regional studies, centered on the Greater Southwest. Geographic and regional research techniques, including GIS, field methods and air photos. Includes an independent project and off-campus fieldwork.

Prerequisite: Required for Southwest Studies majors.

1 unit — Perramond

SW273 Southwestern Arts & Culture

Introduces interdisciplinary methods of analysis and interpretation in Southwestern expressive media including music, dance, oral literature, drama, visual arts, and material culture. Selected genres and styles of Native American and Latino expression are explored within their cultural and historical contexts. Introduces central issues in Southwestern expressive culture, such as cultural performance, symbolic communication, creativity and social process, acquisition of artistic competence, gender roles, tourism and commodification, authenticity, representation and appropriation, intellectual property rights, and repatriation of expressive media. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW275 The American Southwest: The Heritage and the Variety

An interdisciplinary and intercultural introduction to the American Southwest: its histories, peoples, cultures, conflicting ethnic demands and common social problems. Through the use of a variety of anthropological, historical, and literary materials, the course examines the major Southwestern cultures in isolation and in relation to one another. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: No credit after FS/SW 175.

1 unit

SW280 Topics in Literature: The Nature Essay (w/Emp on Wrt

(Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW291 Southwest American Indian Music

Music and culture of Southwest American Indians, with emphasis on Pueblo and Athabascan peoples. Considers origin narratives, cosmology, ritual drama, dance, and other aesthetic modes as related to Southwest Indian musical performance. Addresses traditional as well as new music. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. No prerequisites. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement.

Also listed as Anthropology 208 and Music 291.

1 unit — Levine

SW300 Advanced Topics in Southwest Studies

Selected topics related to the Southwest taught at an advanced level. Content and prerequisites will vary from course-to-course. (Not offered 2014-15).

.5 to 1 unit

SW301 Political Ecology of the Southwest

Surveys the geographic, historic, and political diversity of Southwestern livelihoods and cultural strategies. Highlights the struggles and problem solving efforts of local-regional peoples in changing ecological and economic conditions. Uses political ecology as a framework and lens for understanding nature-society problems and solutions. Multi-day-off-campus field trip. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement.

1 unit — Perramond

SW303 Animal Ecology

A field course involving collection, identification, and population and life-history studies of animals of regional ecosystems. Principles of animal ecology, behavior, and biogeography are emphasized through field case studies and discussion of primary literature. Field work includes sampling techniques and their application to answer specific research questions. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Biology 208 and either Biology 106, 108, or 109; or consent of instructor. No credit after Biology 203.

1 unit

SW307 Museums and the Presentation of the Southwest

Examines the role of museums as educational institutions in preserving and presenting cultural products and heritages. Emphasis on the hands-on analysis of artifacts, interpretation of material culture and the presentation of the cultures of the Southwest. (Limited to 16 students.) Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 111 or consent of instructor.

1 unit

SW308 Topics:

Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.

1 unit

SW311 Topics in Southwest Studies:

An introduction to the geochemical, physical hydrological and biological properties of water systems at the level of a watershed. This course applies principles of physical hydrology, redox, acid-base and solubility chemistry, sampling and experimental design. Includes a significant laboratory component involving GIS and the analysis of samples collected in the field. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW320 Field Archaeology

Methods and concepts employed by the archaeologist in excavation. Both field and laboratory techniques are utilized to obtain the information from which site reports are written. What kinds of inferences about culture can be made from excavated material and the excavation process? Four weeks in the field. (Limited to 14 students.) (Not offered 2014-15).

2 units

SW321 Rio Grande: Culture, History and Region

An interdisciplinary course based on history, culture, and water issues. It will explore the cultural heritage and creativity of groups whose historical experience has been shaped by the Rio Grande basin from its origin in Colorado to its mouth in the Gulf of Mexico. The course will engage a broad American and international public in the exploration of how the river basin and the people who live within it change, evolve, and develop together, and can affect each other. Limited to 12 students. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. May meet either the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures or Social Inequality requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor.

2 units

SW338 Latina/o Literature in the US

S. Comparative study of works of Chicano, Puerto Rican, and Cuban authors, as well as Latin American writers in exile in the United States, including political essays of Marti and Flores Magun and the contemporary works of Hinojosa, Mohr, Laviera, Rivera, Alegra, and Valenzuela. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement. Meets the Critical Perspectives: Global Cultures requirement. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW339 Chicano Literature

Critical study of the literary production of authors of Mexican heritage in the United States from 1848 to the present, with emphasis on contemporary Chicano works including Rivera, Anaya, Valdez, El Teatro Campesino, Cisneros, Castillo, and Moraga. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW341 Ecological Economics and Sustainability

Provides an introduction to ecological economics (an interdisciplinary approach to understanding and managing the ecology and economics of our world) and introduces/extends students' understanding of sustainability (meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs). It reviews options for economically efficient allocation of resources that also protect the stock of natural capital over spatial and temporal space; and investigates the application of tools of analysis and solutions to a regional management problem in the American West. (Week field trip, extra expense for students not on campus Board Plan.) ; for Environmental Science credit: EC 141 or EV 141. (Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW390 Independent Research in Southwest Studies:

Independent research based on library, laboratory, or field investigation of a cross-disciplinary question concerning the Southwest.

Prerequisite: Two previous SW courses, consent of both the instructor and the Southwest Studies program director, and registration at least four weeks prior to the block in which the research is to be initiated.

1 unit — Perramond

SW395 Junior Research Seminar

A seminar for third-year students, organized around a common set of Southwest readings with coverage of inter-disciplinary research methods, and designed so that majors can complete a research proposal to carry out in their senior capstone project. Special attention to regional or area studies as an organizing principle for the courses.

Prerequisite: Majors & Minors Only.

1 unit — Guerra

SW400 Senior Capstone Project:

Independent research project based on field or archival research to be done in consultation with two faculty members. A proposal for the project would need to be approved by Faculty Advisory Committee by the end of the junior year.

Prerequisite: consent of instructor & Southwest Studies 175, 272, 273, 3 units from approved SWS course list & required methodology course.

1 unit — Guerra, Montano, Perramond

SW401 Senior Capstone Project:

Prerequisite: Southwest Studies 175, 272, 273, 3 units from approved SWS course list & required methodology course.

1 unit — Guerra, Perramond

SW410 Ornithology

Identification, taxonomy, anatomy, physiology, behavior and ecology of birds, including field and laboratory work. (Not offered 2014-15).

Prerequisite: consent of instructor or Biology 203.

1 unit

SW446 Special Topics: Herpetology

(Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit

SW530 Native Americans Under Federal Law

(Not offered 2014-15).

1 unit