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Course Listing

I. Required Courses
II.ES 212: Theories of Race and Ethnicity
III.Research Method Courses
IV.Two Units of Electives

I. Required Courses

ES 185: Introduction to Comparative Study of Race and Ethnicity
This course examines those social forces, both historical and contemporary, that have brought about racial and ethnic “diversity” and “difference” in the U.S.  Attention is given to the histories and experiences of Native Peoples, African Americans, Latinos, and Asian Americans.  Taking a comparative approach, it puts into focus the shared histories of racialization among these groups without losing sight of asymmetrical relations of power informing these histories.  The course sheds light on the ways these groups position themselves and are positioned as racial subjects in distinct and historically specific ways but also in relational and mutually constitutive ways ES 185, for example, speaks to the need to expose students to a comparative approach and a consideration of power.  (This is a required course for the Race and Ethnic Studies minor, but is open to all students who wish to take it).

ES 212: Theories of Race and Ethnicity
This course examines various theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of race and ethnicity.  Attention is given to the various ways race and ethnicity have been defined and understood including the ethnicity paradigm, class-based perspectives, and racial formation theory.  The course examines debates and controversies in the study of race and ethnicity as well as emergent themes and recent developments in the scholarship.  Possible topics include a focus on the interrelations among race and other axes of difference such as gender, class, and sexuality, race and the structuring of space, the legal construction of race, race and media culture, and race and the prison-industrial complex. ES 212 speaks to the need to expose students to various theoretical and conceptual approaches to the study of race and ethnicity.  (This is a required course for the Race and Ethnic Studies minor, but is open to all students who wish to take it).

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II. ES 212: Theories of Race and Ethnicity

The following courses offered in a given block may be considered as alternatives to ES212 upon consultation with the RES adviser

Anthropology

AN310: Anthropology and the History of Ideas
The intellectual history of sociocultural anthropology will form the foundation of this course. It will discuss the ideas and intellectuals who contributed to the development of anthropology as a scholarly discipline and will consider the following theoretical perspectives: evolutionism, functionalism, historical particularism, cultural materialism, and interpretive approaches. Also, it will examine field research strategies that shaped anthropology. Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor. (Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 310.) 1 unit  —  Montano.

AN371: Culture Contact and Writing Cultures
This course will incorporate the work of anthropology and cultural studies to introduce students to how foreign cultures were experienced and represented by travelers, explorers, colonial administrators and anthropologists and will focus on forms of writing associated with conquest and colonialism. Students will then be introduced to the travel and tourism genre of representation and will analyze travel writing as cultural politics and the politics of tourism. The course will conclude with an examination of the new ethnography and writing cultures. Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

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Asian Studies

PA224: Chinese Women Writers and Their Works
This course will focus on a comparative study of the voice of Chinese women writers in the 1920s and 1980s, examine women writers’ works in a social-historical context, and discuss the difference of women’s places and problems in traditional Chinese culture and modern Chinese society. The course will also try to define the similar and different expressions of “feminism” as a term in the West and the East. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

PA251: Japanese Women Writers [writing emphasis]
Japanese women writers wrote the most heralded novels and poetic diaries in the classical literary canon; this celebration of women’s literary contributions is an anomaly among world literatures. Yet for over five hundred years, women’s literary voices were silenced before reemerging in the modern era, when a renaissance of “women’s literature” (joryu bungaku) captured popular imagination, even as it confronted critical disparagement. This course traces the rise, fall and return of writing by women and the influence of attitudes toward gender on what was written and read through a wide array of literary texts, historical documents, and cultural artifacts. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

PA253: Women in Hinduism & Islam
An exploration of constructions of gender and the status of women in Hindu and Islamic cultures, with attention to both texts and practices. Primary and secondary readings survey a variety of topics from classical and modern periods, including marriage, sexuality and reproduction, sati, Islamic law, devotion, renunciation and tantra. Prerequisite: Religion 140 or 160 or consent of instructor. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

PA257: Women in Hinduism & Buddhism
Prerequisite: Religion 160 or 170 or consent of instructor. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

PA331: Comparative Politics: China Under Reform
Emphasis on the period of reform and opening to the world after 1976 and the contemporary politics of the People’s Republic of China.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or Political Science 103 or 201. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Political Science 331.) 1 unit  —  Ito.

PA348: Women’s Liberation Movement in Communist China
An analysis of the women’s liberation movement in China, the growth of “Communist Party Feminism,” the transition of women from “beasts of burden to second-class citizens.” (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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English

EN301: Reading the Popular
Textual and historical analysis of “formula fiction” and popular genres such as romances, Westerns, thrillers, detective stories, horror stories, and science fiction, while also examining traditional ways of distinguishing between “high art” and the popular. Readings from such authors as Harriet Beecher Stowe, H. G. Wells, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Zane Grey, Margaret Mitchell, Raymond Chandler, Ian Fleming, Stephen King, as well as selected critics and theorists. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

EN380: Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies:

  • Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies: Beginnings.
  • Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies: The Romantic Vision.
  • Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies: Black Women Writers and Slavery
  • Advanced Topics in Literary and Cultural Studies: Borderlands, Theory, Song and Literature.

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Feminist and Gender Studies

FG103: Asian Perspectives on Feminism
An examination of feminism in Asia. Emphasis will be placed on the diversity of goals and strategies adopted by Asian women for liberating themselves from oppressive attitudes and customs as well as for empowering them. Traditional philosophical works, contemporary literature, film, and journal articles by Asian women will be consulted. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

FG201: Sociology of Sexuality
Explores the ways in which sexual identities, desires and practices are socially constructed and, as such, how they vary historically and culturally. The course will address a range of theoretical and methodological approaches that have contributed to the sociological study of sexuality, including psychoanalytic theory, survey research, social constructionism, feminist theory, critical race theory and queer theory. Specific topics include the political economy of sex; the construction of sexual identities; intersections of sexuality, gender, race and class; social movements; sexuality and institutions; families; marriage and “moral panics.” Prerequisite:

FG250: African-American Feminist Thought in Politics
African-American feminist thought, also called “womanism,” is usually considered to be a coherent theory worldwide that uses experience as the arbitrator of Truth. This course will explore the development of this body of feminist theory by reading the “classics” of proto-womanist theory, from Angela Davis, Michelle Wallace, and Bonnie Hill Thorton, to its intellectual maturity in the works of Barbara Smith, Bell Hooks, Darlene Clark Hine, and Patricia Hill Collins in order to discuss the nature of African-American female political activism. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

FG338: Latina/o Literature in the United States
Comparative study of works of Chicana, Puerto Rican, and Cuban authors, as well as Latin American writers in exile in the United States, including works by Cherrie Moraga, Gloria Anzaldua, Cristina Garcia, Nicholasa Mohr, and Julia Alvarez. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

FG339: Chicano Literature
Prerequisite: Spanish 306 or consent of instructor. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

FG387: African-American Women Writers
Three centuries of texts by African-American women who have conspired with, rebelled against, and created literary traditions, such as Zora Neale Hurston, Pauline Hopkins, Rita Dove, Andrea Lee, and Nella Larsen. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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French

FR211: Intermediate French and Cultural Studies in Francophone Africa
The sub-Saharan African region, specifically the country of Senegal, offers a unique experience to students, from both linguistic and socio-cultural perspectives. The course for Summer Session 2006 will provide students with the unique opportunities to travel in Africa and study language (in this case intermediate French) and culture within the broader international content. It will be based primarily on perspectives on literature, history, geography, social anthropology, politics, ecology and arts and crafts as well as on a formal and total immersion in language learning. The course will be mostly an exploratory learning experience, which includes an introduction to contemporary Africa through historical perspectives: examining the diversity of African cultures and sub-cultures through their indigenous and inherited legacies, particularly the Francophone regions. The course will also investigate the geo-politics of the colonial legacies by analyzing “the African” definition of the state within the concept of nationhood. Furthermore, the course will expose the participant students to the intricate nature of African cultures, largely through prevailing cultural norms such as notions of caste, class and governmental politics, of the local African religions and the arts, etc. In regards to the ecology, guided field trips will be organized to expose participants to the diverse and rich nature of the Senegalese savanna fauna and flora. (Not offered 2008-09.) 2 units.

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History

HY250: Social Movements in United States History
This course examines the role of social movements that have strived to achieve social, cultural, political and economic change in the United States. Cases will include movements of the 19th and 20th centuries including antislavery, Populism, nativist movements, workers’ movements, the 1960s reform cycle (civil rights, student, and welfare rights movements and feminism), direct action anti-nuclear movements, and the Christian right. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY200: Topics in History: Gender in America – From Colonial Times to 1920
This course will explore gender’s influence on the ways people organized their relationships with their families, communities, jobs, and the state during the eighteenth, nineteenth, and early twentieth centuries. Topics will include colonial gender formations, women’s increasing presence in politics and public life, and the meaning of citizenship. Throughout, attention will be paid to the connections between gender, sexuality, race, and class in cultural, political, and economic contexts. (Also listed as Feminist and Gender Studies 206.) 1 unit  —  Torres-Rouff.

HY231: Women in America before the Civil War
Women in American society, from colonial times to 1860, including issues of race, class and servitude; transformations in pre-industrial work and family relationships; women and slavery; women and religion; women’s efforts to reorder their lives and society. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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Music

MU230: Women in Music
This course examines the interaction of women’s musical lives with politics, society, and spirituality, and will focus primarily on the twentieth century. We will look at artists like Aretha Franklin and South Africa’s Miriam Makeba and their relationship to the Civil Rights struggles in their countries; Joni Mitchell, Holly Near, punk rocker Patti Smith, and performance artist Laurie Anderson and their relationship to the feminist movement; Mary Lou Williams Billie Holiday, Bessie Smith and the integration of women into jazz; Joan Tower, Marin Alsop, Maria Callas, Marian Anderson and the traditions of Western Classical Music; and the role of the ingenue and character roles in the Broadway musical – from Rodgers and Hammerstein to Stephen Sondheim. In addition to twentieth century women, we will also review the lives of women frame drummers of earliest history, as well as the seminal figures Amy Beach, Clara Schumann, and the mystic visionary Hildegard von Bingen. Women’s diaries and oral histories will be a major source for the class, as well as video and extensive listening to recordings. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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Philosophy

PH284: Feminist Philosophies
An exploration of the many “feminisms” which pattern the rich and expanding field of feminist theory. Focus will be on feminism’s intersection with many of the important theoretical movements of the 20th century, e.g., American Pragmatism, French philosophies, Marxism, Postmodernism, with special emphasis on Postcolonialism, psychoanalysis, Black, Lesbian, and Gay Studies, etc. Possible theorists are: Butler, Kristeva, Irigaray, Lorde, Hooks, Wittig, de Lauretis, Belsey, Minh-ha. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

PH285: Philosophy & Race
Race is a social construct that invites a number of philosophical questions, such as those of identity, inter-subjectivity, justice, rationality, and culturally different ways of knowing. The course will examine, among others, philosophical reflections on race by the following thinkers: Douglass, West, Fanon, Vasconcelos, Appiah, Bernsaconi, Outlaw, Levinas, Mendieta. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Hernandez-Lemus.

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Political Science

PS123: Race in America: A Conversation
(Not offered 2009-10.) .5 unit.

PS203: Topics in Politics

  • Block 1: Topics in Politics: African Politics. 1 unit  —  Lemasle.
  • Block 2: Topics in Politics: The Search for Islamic Order: Yesterday and Today. Prerequisite: FYE Course. 1st Years Only. Must take History 100 block one for credit. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Lee.
  • Half-Block: Topics in Politics: The Politics of Energy: Sustainability and International Security. .5 unit  —  Price-Smith.
  • Block 5: Topics in Politics: Studying Asia. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Asian Studies 290.) 1 unit  —  Ito.

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Religion

RE138: Feminist Religious Thought
An introduction to feminist theology and ethics in the Christian and Judaic tradition, with attention to such issues as God, love, justice, community, sexuality, liberation, and ecofeminism. Readings to include Ruether, Plaskow, McFague, Welch, and Heyward. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

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Sociology

SO113: Racial Inequality The study of race as a dimension of inequality in the United States, Western Europe, Africa and Latin America. Individual and institutional forms of racism and discrimination. Historical, comparative and theoretical perspectives. (No credit if taken after SO/CS233). (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 113.) 1 unit  —  Wong.

SO237: Latino Immigration and Social Change
Since the early 1980s, both legal and undocumented immigration to the United States have reached historic highs. This course examines contemporary migration from Latin America and how it has transformed urban and rural areas in the U. S. and prompted new questions about racial and ethnic diversity and immigrant rights. After considering the historical linkages between Latin America and the U. S. and the conditions that have generated high levels of migration, the course assesses urban economic restructuring and the ethnic and gendered divisions of labor, the role of immigrant networks in international migratory processes and immigrant organizing initiatives. Prerequisite: Any 100-level Sociology course or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SO243: Social Movements
An examination of the conditions that facilitate social movement activism and the strategic choices activists face as their movements develop. Analysis of the changing grievances and goals of social movements in late modern societies. Examples from recent social movements of the left and right, such as the civil rights, student, women’s, environmental, anti-tax, and anti-abortion movements. Prerequisite: Any 100-level Sociology course or consent of instructor. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SO257: Globalization and Immigration on the U.S.-Mexico Border
The current era of globalization has generated the apparent contradiction between the free flow of capital across borders and restrictive immigration policy. This course will examine these trends as they apply to the U. S. -Mexican border region and will consider issues such as the following: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the multifaceted nature of integration between U. S. and Mexican economies, the increase in low wage jobs in the U. S. economy requiring higher levels of Latino immigration, economic development in Mexico that has generated emigration to the US, and US and Mexican immigration policies including the militarization of the US-Mexican border. Prerequisite: Any 100-level Sociology course, Soph standing, Spanish language skills recommended and consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Southwest Studies 257.) (May be offered as a January half-block.) 1 unit  —  Popkin.

SO265: Immigrant Communities in Colorado
The changing demographics of front range communities in Colorado and the socio-economic conditions that generate poverty will be examined as a case study of immigration theory. The increasing diversity of Colorado Springs, Denver, and Pueblo, due in part to high levels of immigration particularly from Latin America, creates new challenges for the city including the provision of adequate housing and social services and racial and ethnic integration in public schools and other institutions. This community based learning course offers students the opportunity to volunteer with a local organization serving immigrants. Prerequisite: Any 100-level Sociology course or consent of instructor. Spanish language skills recommended. Must complete 1/2 block and extended format to receive credit. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SO303: Sociology of Sexuality
The ways in which sexual identities, desires and practices are socially constructed and, as such, how they vary historically and culturally. The course will address a range of theoretical and methodological approaches that have contributed to the sociological study of sexuality, including psychoanalytic theory, survey research, social constructionism, feminist theory, critical race theory and queer theory. Specific topics include the political economy of sex; the construction of sexual identities; intersections of sexuality, gender, race and class; social movements; sexuality and institutions; families; marriage and “moral panics.” Prerequisite: Any 200-level Sociology course or Consent of Instructor. (Also listed as Feminist and Gender Studies 303.) 1 unit  —  Pascoe.

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III. Research Method Courses

One unit of a Research Methods Course: Students can select a research methods course that is suitable to the student’s focus, chosen in consultation with the Race Ethnic Studies advisor.  Currently, there are 24 courses in 14 disciplines that can meet the research methods requirement. Examples of such courses are:

Anthropology

  • AN215: Research Design: Method and Theory
  • AN321: Rio Grande – Culture, History and Region

Comparative Literature

  • CO310: Jr. Seminar in Comparative Literature
  • CO410: Research Topics in Comparative Literature

Dance

  • DS210: Dance Studio: Choreography/Performance

Economics

  • EC200: Methods I: Statistics
  • EC408: Econometrics
  • EC303: Methods II: Research Methods

Education

  • ED399: Content Methods and Critical Pedagogy

English

  • EN308: Advanced Poetry Workshop
  • EN309: Advanced Fiction Workshop
  • EN480: Senior Seminar
  • EN485: Senior Project

Environmental Studies

  • EV222: Quantitative Methods in Environmental Science

Feminist and Gender Studies

  • FG311: Feminist Research Methods

History

  • HY399: Studying History
  • HY406: Research Workshop

Italian

  • IT431: Methods of analysis and theories of literature and culture. Training in research methodology; selection of topic for senior project, portfolio, or senior thesis; research and presentation of work in progress. Required of all majors. Prerequisite: Required of Majors. 2 Italian courses above Italian 306 and consent of instructor. 1 unit  —  Department.

Philosophy

  • Philosophy Jr. Seminar

Psychology

  • PY202: Research Design

Religion

  • RE302: Seminar in Theory & Method

Sociology

  • SO229: Sociological Research Design
  • SO301: Quantitative Research Methods
  • SO302: Qualitative Research Methods

Southwest Studies

  • SW272: Nature, Region and Society of the Southwest
  • SW308: Topics Community-Based Field Course

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IV. Two units of electives

All elective courses have to be cross-listed with Race and Ethnic Studies. The following courses might fulfill the two units of electives.

Anthropology

AN102: Cultural Anthropology
The study of human societies through the central concept of culture. Explores such topics as meaning, adaptation, social organization, kinship, religion, environment, technology and conflict. Presents anthropological themes including holism, comparison, dynamism and cultural relativism, as well as methodological approaches to studying human experience in naturally occurring contexts. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit

AN105: Language and Culture
Examines the interconnectedness of language and culture from ethnographic and sociolinguistic perspectives. Comparative study of speaking in cultural context aimed at understanding the ways in which people use talk to cooperate, manipulate, structure events, and negotiate identities. Cross-cultural focus, with examples from such languages as Japanese, Navajo and Apache, African-American Vernacular, and French. 1 unit–Watkins. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit

AN203: States and Empires in the Ancient Andes
Andean South America was home to some of the first and most complex societies in the Western hemisphere. People in the Andes built large cities and established states that came to control large areas. This course will focus exclusively on the development and expansion of states and empires in the pre-Columbian Andes, concentrating attention on Moche, Wari, Tiwanaku and the Inka. Emphasis will be placed on the use of ceremonial and monumental architecture, the development of pristine states, urbanism, and imperial expansion. No credit if taken after AN 207: Prehistory of the Andes. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.)

AN207: Prehistory of the Andes
This course will examine the patterns of development of Andean culture from its earliest roots over five millennia ago through the Spanish conquest in the 16th century. We will look at how this unique environment gave birth to highly efficient adaptations and cultural systems. Emphasis will be placed on trade and interaction in the Andean sphere, the development of complex social and political structures, and early contacts with Europeans. The focus will be on recent archaeological investigations and interpretations combined with appropriate analogy from ethnohistory and ethnography. No credit if taken after AN 203: States and Empires in the Ancient Andes. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit.

AN222: Topics in Ethnomusicology

  • Pop Music of South Asia, the Middle East and North Africa. This course explores popular music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa – as well from these regions’ diasporic populations in the United States and Europe. Throughout the course, we consider how technology, mass media, and migration have over the last century shaped and still shape communities’ respective cultural identities, particularly in the contemporary context of globalization. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Music 232 and Asian Studies 250.) 1 unit
  • From Bombay to Bollywood -Music and the Popular Indian Film. Since the 1930s, the presence of the film song sequence has been a hallmark of Indian popular cinema, to the extent that film song sequences and songs often play an important role in helping promote the films they appear in. This course examines how film music has helped define Bombay cinema as the global industry now known as “Bollywood”, as well as how film song sequences work within and outside films’ narratives to create a unique aesthetic. Although international audiences have enjoyed Bombay films and film music since the 1950s, the term “Bollywood” did not emerge until the late 1980s. Since then, it has often accompanied descriptions of Bombay films’ transformation from a regional industry into a multimedia global brand- experienced through cinema; the Internet; satellite television; music and video recordings; radio; and ring tones, almost all of which feature music at their core. This viewing-intensive course surveys older as well as recent popular Bombay films and explores their film songs’ stylistic conventions, context within films, and their life outside the cinema hall. In doing so, students trace the shift from Bombay to “Bollywood” as well as gain a fundamental understanding of South Asian popular culture. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Music 233 and Asian Studies 223.) 1 unit  —

AN236: Peoples of Latin America
Introduces anthropological perspectives on Latin America, including South and Central America and with some references to the Caribbean. A historical and geographical overview is followed by investigation of key cultural themes and problems faced throughout the region: the legacy of European colonialism and U. S. imperialism; dependent development; political forms from authoritarian to democratic; machismo and marianismo as gendered ideologies; the Protestant challenge to Catholic ubiquity; environmental crises; urbanization; foreign debt; and ethnic conflict.

AN237: Blacks in the Caribbean and Latin America
Compares the experiences of diverse groups of the African Diaspora, with special emphasis on the Caribbean basin and Brazil. Topics include: race, racism and nation-building; the legacy of slavery and contemporary labor processes, conceptualizing the “Africa” in African-American cultures; variable social constructions of racial categories; maroons and other communities of resistance; and several African-American religions (Candomble, Umbanda, Voudoun, Santeria, Rastafarianism). 1 unit

AN238: Gender and Class in Latin America
Introduces anthropological perspectives on gender and class dynamics, including South and Central America along with the Hispanophone Caribbean. Readings center on women’s role in production, reproduction, and development, while also incorporating specific approaches to masculinity and men’s social roles. Emphasizes ethnographic analyses in which class and gender are treated as interconnected categories. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.)

AN239: Women, Men, and “Others:” Gender Cross-Culturally
A cross-cultural approach to gender, emphasizing variability in the ways gender shapes social interaction and organization. After addressing the relationship between biological sex and culturally constructed gender and diverse sex-gender systems, the course proceeds to closely examine non-binary gender systems, where “third” (or more) genders emerge: hijras in India, berdaches in diverse Native American peoples, and travestis in Brazil. Various anthropological and feminist theoretical frameworks are applied. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

AN243: Hispanic Folklore of the Southwest
(with Emphasis on Writing). This course is designed to introduce students to several approaches in folklore studies and to Mexican material culture, religion, music, and prose narratives in the Southwest region of the United States. We will examine how the different approaches used by historians, literary critics, anthropologists, and folklorists can enhance the study of Hispanic folklore and material culture. (Limited to 12 students.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit.

AN250: Language & Culture
Examines the interconnectedness of language and culture from ethnographic and sociolinguistic perspectives. Comparative study of speaking in cultural context aimed at understanding the ways in which people use talk to cooperate, manipulate, structure events, and negotiate identities. Cross-cultural focus, with examples from such languages as Japanese, Navajo and Apache, African-American Vernacular, and French.  1 unit.

AN251: The Study of Folklore I
A survey of the main forms of folklore, with emphasis on definition, identification, and collection of traditional oral forms (tales, legends, myths, ballads, beliefs, jokes, riddles, etc.) Includes a collecting project designed to introduce students to the traditional expressions of ethnic or other cultural groups. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as English 251.) 1 unit

AN260: Language & Gender
Explores how language is used by women and men in sociocultural context. Examines and critiques anthropological and sociolinguistic research on the relationship of language and gender. Readings provide a cross-cultural perspective and students collect and analyze samples of language use in their own speech community. 1 unit.

AN291: Southwest American Indian Music
Music and culture of Southwest American Indians, with emphasis on Pueblo and Athabascan peoples. Considers origins narratives, cosmology, ritual drama, dance, and other aesthetic modes as related to Southwest Indian musical performance. Addresses traditional as well as new music. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. No prerequisites. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit.

AN294: Latino Musics of the United States
Explores the role of music in the expression of ethnicity and ethnic identity among Latino peoples of the United States. Various musical styles and genres performed by New Mexicans, Texas-Mexicans, Puerto Rican Americans, and Cuban Americans are considered. Traditional and popular Latino musics are examined within their cultural and historical contexts. 1 unit.

AN295: Indonesian Music
Surveys Indonesian history, culture, society, religion, and aesthetic values through music. Students become familiar with a variety of Indonesian musical repertories, styles, and performance contexts, including court traditions of Java, Sunda, and Bali and village traditions throughout the Indonesian archipelago. Traditional as well as new music are discussed. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit.

AN307: Museums and the Presentation of the Southwest
Examines the role of museums as educational institutions in preserving and presenting cultural products and heritages. Emphasis on the interpretation of material culture and the presentation of the cultures of the Southwest. Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor. 1 unit.

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Art History

AH180: Native American Art
An introduction to Native American art, with emphasis on the arts of the Southwest. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit.

AH200: Topics in Art History
Art of India. A survey of the arts of India, including architecture and landscape architecture, sculpture, painting, and material culture. Particular attention will be paid to connecting the art to the philosophical and religious traditions; as well as issues of colonialism and post colonialism. Active trade connections both to the East and to the West will be considered. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit

AH265: China/Europe/Japan: Art and International Trade 1550-1800
Considers the impact on art of expanding sea trade between Europe and East Asia in the early modern period. Begins by examining what goods went where; how increasingly global trade affected particular economies; how the East India companies operated; and what effects stepped-up contact had stylistically and iconographically on art forms such as porcelain, prints and paintings. On a more theoretical level, the course addresses “things foreign” as a means of asserting cultural authority at home; and the impact of vastly expanded markets on the artist’s practice and identity. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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Asian Studies

PA115: Confluence and Conflict in Asian Culture
Indian, Chinese, Japanese and Korean literature, art and politics with particular attention to interrelationships among Asian countries and their ongoing dialogue with Western cultures. Course includes a museum visit, a number of films, and opportunities to examine Asian art objects firsthand. (Also listed as AH 115.) Prerequisite: FYE Course. 1st Years Only. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 2 units.

PA160: Hinduism
A historical and thematic introduction to Hindu tradition from prehistoric India to the present day, focusing on classic texts and popular rituals. Topics include the Rig Veda, the Upanisads and the rise of Buddhism, the great epics (Mahabharata and Ramayana), Yoga, the Bhagavadgita, Indian art and music, devotional movements and poetry, Goddess worship, dharma, the caste system, Hindu nationalism, Gandhi, and Indian independence. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Religion 160.) 1 unit  —  Department.

PA199: Islam
A historical and thematic introduction to Islamic traditions from the seventh century CE to the present day, focusing on fundamental texts and practices. Topics include the Abrahamic context of Islam, the Prophet Muhammad, the Qur’an, the rise of sectarian movements (Shi’a and Sunni), ritual and pilgrimage, Islamic law, Sufism, women in Islam, the challenges of modernity, and Islam in America. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Religion 140.) 1 unit  —  Wright.

PA228: East Asia Since 1200
Examines the history of East Asia from the height of the imperial system before the Mongol invasion to the changes in society, economy, and culture during the Late Imperial Period (14th-19th centuries). Political and social history of China, Japan, and Korea will form the focus of this course. This course will prepare students for advanced study on China and Japan. (Not offered 2008-09.) .25 unit.

PA230: 20th Century Japan
This course will trace the social, political, and cultural developments in Japan from the first Parliamentary elections in 1890 to the current fiscal crisis in the 1990s. Using a wide range of sources, students will explore major themes in Japan’s empire, World War, economic miracle, and troubled role as Asian leader. Major themes will include cross-cultural contact, world systems, and women’s history. Prerequisite: 1.00S. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

PA265: China/Europe/Japan Art and International Trade
Considers the impact on art of expanding sea trade between Europe and East Asia in the early modern period. Begins by examining what goods went where, how increasingly global trade affected particular economies; how the East India companies operated, and what effects stepped up contact had stylistically and iconographically on art forms such as porcelain, prints and paintings. On a theoretical level, the course addresses “things foreign” as a means of asserting the artist’s practice and identity. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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Comparative literature

CO351: Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature
Advanced Topics in Comparative Literature: Literature of the Borderlands.

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Drama

DR200: Topics in Drama
Topics in Drama: The Plays of August Wilson.

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English

EN251: The Study of Folklore I
A survey of the main forms of folklore, with emphasis on definition, identification, and collection of traditional oral forms (tales, legends, myths, ballads, beliefs, jokes, riddles, etc.). Includes a collecting project designed to introduce students to the traditional expressions of ethnic or other cultural groups. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Anthropology 251.) 1 unit  —  Seward.

EN253: The Literature of the American Southwest
The literature of the Native Americans, the Spanish, and the Anglos. Readings in transcribed poetry and song, diaries, folk literature, and modern authors such as D. H. Lawrence, Willa Cather, Edward Abbey, Rudolfo Anaya, and Leslie Silko. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

EN: Poets of the Southwest

EN274: Themes and Types of Literature: Women and Literature
Variable topics course including selected themes organized along regional, generic, interdisciplinary, and cultural boundaries. Also may address specific treatments of women characters in works by and women during different periods of English and American literary history. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

EN280: Topics in Literature

  • Topics in Literature: Introduction to African Literature.
  • Topics in Literature: This Land is Our Land? Culture Clash in the Southwest.
  • Topics in Literature: Mexican-American Literature.
  • Topics in Literature: Writing the Land of Enchantment.
  • Topics in Literature: African Literature.

EN387: African-American Women Writers and Literary Tradition
Three centuries of texts by African-American women who have conspired with, rebelled against, and created literary traditions, such as Zora Neale Hurston, Pauline Hopkins, Rita Dove, Andrea Lee, and Nella Larsen. Prerequisite: 221 or 250 or consent of instructor. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

EN: African American Film

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Feminist and Gender Studies

FG387: African-American Women Writers
Three centuries of texts by African-American women who have conspired with, rebelled against, and created literary traditions, such as Zora Neale Hurston, Pauline Hopkins, Rita Dove, Andrea Lee, and Nella Larsen. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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Film Studies

FS205: Topics in Cinema

FS220: Blacks & the Cinema
An introduction to the relationships Blacks have had to the American cinema: as filmmakers, performers, audiences and as “characters” whose image have formed a critical vocabulary for American race relations. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Department.

FS: African-American Film

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General Studies

GS170: Rhetoric of Civil Rights
Prerequisite: FYE Course. 1st Years Only. (Not offered 2008-09.) 2 units.

GS211: Understanding the Holocaust
(Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

GS234: Issues in Contemporary Africa
A survey of African history followed by discussion of current political, social, and environmental issues in southern Africa. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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History

HY210: History of Native America
Introduces students to the history of native peoples primarily in North America. The course includes histories of individual native groups as well as the relationship between American Indians and a variety of Europeans from before contact until the present. Examines a variety of primary and secondary materials to see patterns in the ways that Native Americans have been affected by the process of conquest, the ways in which Anglo-Europeans have responded to Native Americans, and in the ways in which American Indians have become a part of and remained apart from “mainstream” American culture. As a broader goal, we also look at the way “history” is made, understood, and used by very different cultural traditions. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY221: Africa & Europe to 1919
Traditional African states, Portugal and Africa, the slave trade, European conquest, occupation and administration. The African response to the European presence in terms of social change, the origins of a “Europeanized” African elite and the beginnings of modern African politics. – Blasenheim,. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Blasenheim.

HY222: The Emergence of Modern Africa, 1885 to the Present
Africa and the Berlin Conference, primary and secondary resistance to European colonialism, political independence, conflicts between traditional and modern cultural patterns and ideologies, one-party rule and economic dependence. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Bose.

HY224: Survey in Latin American History
Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to the present. Emphasis on colonial Mexico and Peru, the centers of Spanish power in the New World, and the political and social development of post-independence Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 2 units  —  Blasenheim.

HY236: Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay since Independence
Political independence in the 1810s in La Plata and Chile. The impact of immigration, urbanization, modernization, populism, nationalism, militarism and redemocratization. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Blasenheim.

HY238: Colonial Hispano-America
Spanish conquest and administration in New Spain and Peru, the Catholic Church, internal and external colonial economies, the Bourbon reforms and political independence in the 1820s; class, caste and gender during the colonial period. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY243: Slavery and Antislavery Movements to 1860
African cultural backgrounds, African slavery in colonial British America and the U. S. to 1860; free Black people from 1790 to 1860 and antislavery movements. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY244: Black People in the US
From the Civil War. Black Reconstruction; Black urban settlement; literary and artistic movements in the 1920s; civil rights struggles; recent social and political expressions. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY262: Islamic Empires and their Discontents, 1500-present
Study of the Middle East through the increasing economic and cultural globalization of the early modern and modern periods. Focus on internal and external ideas of science and technology, economic and individual liberty, and religious identity. Places these in the context of the rise and fall of nationalism, secularism, and Ottoman and European empires in the region. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY267: The Southwest under Spain and Mexico
The pre-contact history of Anasazi and Athabascan peoples from anthropological and mythological perspectives; the causes and consequences of the Spanish entrada and attempts at missionization of the Indian peoples of New Mexico and the California coast; development of mestizo society; the arrival of the Anglo-Americans and the Mexican-American War. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Southwest Studies 267.) 1 unit  —  Monroy.

HY268: History of the Southwest since the Mexican War
The adaptation of Native American and Hispanic peoples to Anglo-American culture and politics; the causes and consequences of the loss of Hispanic lands; the evolution of family life and religious practices; indigenous views of modernity. Films, artistic expressions, and works of fiction as well as historical sources. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as American Cultural Studies 268 and Southwest Studies 268.) 1 unit  —  Monroy.

HY283: The Jews in Modern Europe
The Jews of Poland, Western Europe, and the Islamic world during the 17th century. The Impact of Enlightenment and Assimilation. Hassidism and reform. Anti-Semitism, Zionism, and the American experience. World War I and its consequences: the changing Middle Eastern framework, Communism, Nazism. Israel, and its neighbors, and the world. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY319: Modern Central Asia and Eurasia
This course will focus on those regions that stand at the crossroads of European and Asian history, and that are often neglected in traditionally bounded survey courses. Topics will include the patterns of conquest, trade, technological diffusion, and religious conversion across these regions; the effects of Ottoman, Persian, Russian, Chinese, Soviet and Japanese colonialism; and the emergence of independent nations in the 20th century. Prerequisite: History 218 or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY327: 20th Century China
This course will follow the turbulent history and politics of China from the Boxer Rebellion of 1900 through the post-Mao reforms. Using primary documents, personal accounts, and scholarly studies, students will assess China’s political and cultural changes and continuities in historical context. Prerequisite: History 228, Asian Studies 104 or consent of instructor. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY328: 20th Century Japan
This course will trace the social, political, and cultural developments in Japan from the first Parliamentary elections in 1890 to the current fiscal crisis in the 1990s. Using a wide range of sources, students will explore major themes in Japan’s empire, World War, economic miracle, and troubled role as Asian leader. Major themes will include cross-cultural contact, world systems, and women’s history. Prerequisite: History 228 or Asian Studies 104 or consent of instructor. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

HY340: History of Brazil, 1500 to Present
Portuguese colonization, political independence in a neo-colonial economy, the Brazilian Empire, the Republic. The emergence of modern Brazil: populism, corporatism, and militarism. The institution of slavery and its legacy. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Blasenheim.

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Music

MU201: American Music: From Plymouth Rock to Rock
Survey of music in the United States from the colonial era to present. Both popular and classical music traditions will be examined with special attention given to the social and political contexts in which they developed. The emergence of innovative U. S. musical traditions in the 18th and 19th centuries will be seen as the foundations for the subsequent schools of jazz, musical theater, the nationalistic works of Ives, Copland, and others, the avant garde of the mid 20th century, and the evolution of pop to rock during the 1950s, 60s, and 70s. Finally, attention will be given to recent developments by living composers. No musical background is required. MU 202/FE 202-American Music: From Plymouth Rock to Rock. Survey of music in the United States from the colonial era until the present. Both popular and classical music traditions will be studied with special attention given to the social and political contexts in which they deveoped. In the first block, classical music traditions will be examined: the emergence of innovative U. S. composers in the 18th and 19th Centuries will be seen as the foundations for the nationalistic works of Ives, Copland and others. After study of Tin Pan Alley and the Broadway musical, the block will conclude with an examination of the modern and postmodern movements of the mid and late 20th Century. In the second block, popular music traditions from the same period will be examined, beginning with both European and African roots; the course will survey the evolution of popular genres such as the blues, minstrelsy, jazz and folk, and end with rock and hip hop cultures. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

MU205: Jazz
An introduction to the history, theory and literature of American jazz music. Jazz as a primarily Afro-American cultural expression. Traditional African music and its relation to ragtime and blues. The evolution of jazz from its New Orleans origins to the present, as traced in the recorded legacy of such key innovators as Armstrong, Ellington, Parker, Davis, Monk and Coltrane. Guided listening and collective improvisation. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Scott.

MU211: Miles Ahead: The Miles Davis Years
This course traces the remarkable fifty-year career of one of jazz’s most important innovators. His thinking inspired several distinct stylistic movements in the music, and he was mentor to many younger players who developed into major voices under his leadership. Guided listening to several of Miles most important recordings as well as those of some of his significant proteges and investigation of some of the extra-musical issues surrounding his life and music. No prerequisite, though 205 Introduction to Jazz is recommended. Prerequisite: Music 205 is recommended. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Scott.

MU221: Topics in Ethnomusicology
Special topics in ethnomusicology, approached through emphasis on a particular musical area, theoretical issue, genre or repertory, compositional technique, or instrument. The course is devoted to non-Western musical cultures. Meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor.

MU224: Jewish Music
This interdisciplinary course traces the many musical traditions of the Jewish world communities in a journey from Temple singing and desert ceremonies in biblical times, through music of Mendelssohn, Mahler, and Schoenberg, to works of individuals such as Gershwin, Copland, Berlin, and Bernstein. Included will be a comparative study of the three major religions of the Western world exploring their respective voices and musical interaction. Sociology, literature, religion and history, as well as issues of ethnicity, cultural unity and self-expression, will be engaged in this multicultural search for musical identity. (Also listed as Religion 224.) (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Religion 224.) 1 unit  —  Ben-Amots.

MU232: Popular Music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North
Popular Music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa. This course explores popular music from South Asia, the Middle East, and North Africa – as well from these regions’ diasporic populations in the United States and Europe. Throughout the course, we consider how technology, mass media, and migration have over the last century shaped and still shape communities’ respective cultural identities, particularly in the contemporary context of globalization. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Anthropology 222 and Asian Studies 250.) 1 unit  —  Bhattacharjya.

MU294: Latino Musics of the United States
Explores the role of music in the expression of ethnicity and ethnic identity among Latino peoples of the United States. Various musical styles and genres performed by New Mexicans, Texas-Mexicans, Native Americans, Puerto Rican Americans, and Cuban Americans are considered. Traditional and popular Latino music is examined within their cultural and historical contexts. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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North American Studies

NA267: History of the SW under Spain and Mexico
(Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

NA268: History of the Southwest since the Mexican War
The adaptation of Native American and Hispanic peoples to Anglo-American culture and politics; the causes and consequences of the loss of Hispanic lands; the evolution of family life and religious practices; indigenous views of modernity. Films, artistic expressions, and works of fiction as well as historical sources. (Not offered 2008-09.) 1 unit.

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Philosophy

PH282: African Philosophy
An exploration of themes in African, Caribbean, and North American thought, this course looks closely at ways in which philosophers of the African diaspora have responded to colonialism, the process of decolonization, and the postcolonial situation. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Lee.

PH283: Latin-American Philosophy
A survey of philosophical writings by Latin-American authors in the social and historical context of the region. Texts studied include Indigenous philosophies of the pre-Hispanic tradition, as well as those of the colonial and postcolonial periods. Particular attention will be devoted to issues that are central to this philosophical tradition, such as identity, consciousness through education, and philosophies of liberation. Our readings draw from Aztec or Maya sources, as well as from Leon-Portilla, Vasconcelos, Paz, Freire, Gutierrez, Dussel. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 282.) 1 unit  —  Hernandez-Lemus.

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Political Science

PS227: 20th Century Japan
This course will trace the social, political, and cultural developments in Japan from the first Parliamentary elections in 1890 to the current fiscal crisis in the 1990s. Using a wide range of sources, students will explore major themes in Japan’s empire, World War, economic miracle, and troubled role as Asian leader. Major themes will include cross-cultural contact, world systems, and women’s history. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

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Religion

RE120: Judaism
Leading ideas, documents, movements and historical figures in biblical and postbiblical Judaism. 1 unit  —  Schwarz.

RE140: Islam
An historical and thematic introduction to Islamic traditions from the seventh century CE to the present day, focusing on fundamental texts and practices. Topics include the Abrahamic context of Islam, the Prophet Muhammad, the Qur’an, the rise of sectarian movements (Shi’a and Sunni), ritual and pilgrimage, Islamic law, Sufism, women in Islam, the challenges of modernity, and Islam in America. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Asian Studies 199.) 1 unit  —  Wright.

RE160: Hinduism
An historical and thematic introduction to Hindu traditions from prehistoric India to the present day, focusing on classic texts and popular rituals. Topics include the Rig Veda, the Upanishads and the rise of Buddhism, the great epics (Mahabharata and Ramayana), Yoga, the Bhagavadgita, Indian art and music, devotional movements and poetry, Goddess worship, dharma, the caste system, Hindu nationalism, Gandhi and Indian independence. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Asian Studies 160.) 1 unit  —  Coleman.

RE224: Jewish Music
This interdisciplinary course traces the many musical traditions of the Jewish world communities in a journey from the ancient Temple singing in biblical times to the music of individuals such as George Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein. Included will be a comparative study of the three major religions of the Western world exploring their respective voices and musical interaction. Sociology, literature, religion, and history, as well as issues of ethnicity, cultural unity and self-expression will be engaged in this multicultural search for musical identity. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Music 224.) 1 unit  —  Ben-Amots.

RE291: Black Religion in America
Studies in the religious life of African-Americans from the 17th century to the present. Particular attention to religious organizations, theological formulations and experiential patterns of Black Americans and the relationship of those phenomena to American religious life in general. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

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Southwest Studies

SW102: Place, Space and the Southwest
Survey of the Greater Southwest, the power of place and overlapping cultural geographies of indigenous and European cultures in shaping the history, geography and landscapes of the region. Covers the pre-1492 Southwest, the Spanish conquest and colonial era, and tracks through the Mexican and Anglo-American periods of the Southwest. Considers modern controversies such as land and water use, border issues, environmental challenges, and the maintenance of cultural heritage. Prepares participants for further work in Southwest Studies and affiliated interdisciplinary programs. Some outdoor fieldwork. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW131: Cultural Astronomy of the SW
Surveys the history and concepts of Western astronomy as background for other cultural approaches to astronomy. Focuses on archaeostronomy and ethnoastronomy of Native Southwestern peoples, including ancestral Puebloans as well as modern Pueblo and Athabascan tribes. Explores relationships among astronomy, rock art, ritual, oral narratives, social patterns and beliefs systems. (Meets the Critical Perspectives requirement and the laboratory/field requirement in the Natural Sciences.) (Also listed as AN 211.) No prerequisites. (Meets either the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques or Scientific Investigation of the Natural World lab or field requirement.) (Also listed as Physics 131.) 1 unit  —  Hilt.

SW175: The American Southwest: An Introduction
An interdisciplinary and multicultural introduction to the Greater Southwest: its physical settings, histories, peoples, cultures, conflicting ethnic demands and common problems. By using a variety of materials that may include anthropological, artistic, geographical, historical, and literary approaches, the course examines the region we call the Greater Southwest over time and space, concluding with research into current concerns. Prerequisite: Freshmen Only. (Meets either the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques or The West in Time requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 2 units.

SW183: Community Organizations in the Southwest
Provides students with community learning experiences through a local community organization. Students spend two hours per week working with the organization serving as tutor/mentors for children ages 6 through 12 who are at risk academically. Additional class sessions focus on concepts and theories related to community learning experience, such as race/ethnicity, critical pedagogy, community formation, intercultural dialogue, philanthropy, social justice and social movements. (Offered by the semester as an adjunct course.) No prerequisites. (Not offered 2009-10.) .5 unit.

SW185: In Our Own Backyard: Social Justice in the Southwest
Examines the relationship between social, environmental, and political issues in the Southwest and choices we make personally and institutionally. Traces the resources, both human and natural , that make it possible to live in Colorado Springs and in a college community. Students will work in the field and in the library, developing data about the region. Finally we will consider modes of writing, speaking, data presentation that are essential to effect change. Full year extended format. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.)

SW200: Topics in Southwest Studies.

  • Block 3: Topics in Southwest Studies: The Western. A study of the American Western film. Attention devoted to the history of the Western, from silent to contemporary films. Focusing on the concept of the frontier and westward expansion (Manifest Destiny), Native Americans and other indigenous cultures, the idea of the western hero, individualism versus communal values, landscape, nature and the visual power of Westerns. Major directors: Ford, Mann, Leone, Peckinpah and Eastwood. Major actors: Wayne, Cooper, Stewart, Fonda, Eastwood. (Also listed as Film Studies 205.) 1 unit  —  Simons.
  • Block 5: Topics in Southwest Studies: Theory, Methods, and Practice of Community Based Participatory Research in the Southwest. Explores the theories and methods of Community Based Participatory Research, its application to race, gender and class. Includes case studies of research done by CC students with communities in New Mexico as well as research done by students on CC campus to serve the student community. An actual research project is developed in class, implemented and analyzed for its application to CC student life. (Also listed as Anthropology 209 and Race and Ethnic Studies 200.) 1 unit  —  Varela.
  • Block 6: Topics in Southwest Studies: The Student’s Role in the 1960′s Southern Civil Rights Movement. Through film, readings, discussion, telephone interviews and class presentations, we will examine the role of students, using the Student Non Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) as a case study in the 1960′s African American Civil Rights Movement. Topics include: the differences between the student movement and the movement represented by Dr. Martin Luther King, the difference between mobilization and organization, developing indigenous leadership, women’s role in the movement, the origins of Black Power and what some former SNCC leaders are doing today to evolve the revolution of the 1960s. (Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and History 200.) 1 unit  —  Varela.

SW214: History of Native America
Introduces students to the history of native peoples primarily in North America. The course includes histories of individual native groups as well as the relationship between American Indians and a variety of Europeans from before contact until the present. Examines a variety of primary and secondary materials to see patterns in the ways that Native Americans have been affected by the process of conquest, the ways in which Anglo-Europeans have responded to Native Americans, and in the ways in which American Indians have become a part of and remained apart from “mainstream” American culture. As a broader goal, we also look at the way “history” is made, understood, and used by very different cultural traditions. (Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and History 210.) 1 unit  —  Hyde.

SW220: Environmental Justice in the SW
Conflicts and commonalities between practicing environmentalists (pastoral cultures of New Mexico and southern Colorado) and card-carrying environmentalists. Course topics include historic, economic, and social origins of conflicts between these rural cultures and urban environmentalists and today’s response by pastoral cultures to re-create equitable economies that sustain environment and culture. Field trip to New Mexico and southern Colorado. (Meets the Critical Perspective Requirement.) Writing emphasis. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and Environmental Science 120 and Sociology 190.) 1 unit  —  Varela.

SW228: Environmental Law of the Southwest
Surveys the major environmental laws, and the landmark court decisions interpreting them that affect environmental policy in the Southwest. Topics include mining, grazing, forests, water, Native Americans, and wildlife. (Also listed as PS 203.) No Prerequisites. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW230: Native Americans Under Federal Law
The most influential external force that has shaped the status and culture of contemporary Native Americans has been federal law. The course examines these laws and Supreme Court decisions that led to the forced removal of Native Americans, established trustee doctrine, imposed assimilation policy, allocated land and natural resources, and changed the system of government for Native American tribes. We consider current efforts by Native Americans to enforce the laws that were enacted to protect their interests but which have been ignored for centuries. Focus is in the Southwest including current litigation over water rights in Colorado, land in New Mexico, and hunting and fishing rights in much of the region. No prerequisites. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Kannan.

SW237: Latino Immigration and Urban Change
(Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW242: The Anthropology of Food (with emphasis on writing)
This course will explore food concepts, analytical methods, and the food habits of different ethnic groups. The class will have a field trip to the San Luis Valley, and to Northern New Mexico to document the production of food among farmers, cattle ranchers, and restauranteurs. (Limited to 12 students.) No prerequisites. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW243: Hispanic Folklore of the Southwest (with emphasis on writing)
This course is designed to introduce students to several approaches in folklore studies and to Mexican material culture, religion, music, and prose narratives in the Southwest region of the United States. We will examine how the different approaches used by historians, literary critics, anthropologists, and folklorists can enhance the study of Hispanic folklore and material culture. (Limited to 12 students.) No prerequisites. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW250: Regional Studies
(Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW253: Literature of the American Southwest: Contemporary Poets
This course will examine the work of poets living in or writing about the Southwest, including but not limited to poetry that grows out of the three major cultural traditions of the Southwest-Native American, Anglo, and Latino. Students will have the opportunity to write poems as well as to analyze poetry. No prerequisites.

  • Block 5: Literature of the Southwest: Mexican American Literature. This course provides a broad overview of movements in Mexican-American literature in the twentieth century, from Revolutionary corridos, to Chicano movement documents, through the development of Chicana feminism. This interdisciplinary course emphasizes a relation between historical events and literary production. Authors to include Americo Paredes, Tomas Rivera, and Sandra Cisneros. Prerequisite: (Writing Intensive). (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as English 253 and Race and Ethnic Studies 253.) 1 unit  —  Padilla.
  • Block 7: Literature of the Southwest: Introduction to Native American Literature This course will explore locally available resources to help students expand their understandings of what it is to be literate, and to provide some models for understanding organically American forms of literacy. The second part of the course will explore how Native American voices are mediated by and for European purposes. Finally, the course will present Native American authors who write from the early twentieth century to the present day, and help students to explore how these authors trouble and work with European and American models of literacy. The goal of this course is to expand first and second year students’ ideas about literacy, culture, and Native American lives. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as English 280 and Race and Ethnic Studies 253.) 1 unit  —  Padilla.

SW257: Globalization and Immigration on the U.S.-Mexican Border
The current era of globalization has generated the apparent contradiction between the free flow of capital across borders and restrictive immigration policy. The course examines these trends as they apply to the U. S. -Mexican border region and will consider issues such as the following: the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the multifaceted nature of integration between US and Mexican economies, the increase in low wage jobs in the US economy requiring higher levels of Latino immigration, economic development in Mexico that has generated emigration to the US, and US and Mexican immigration policies including the militarization of the U. S. -Mexican border. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Sociology 257.) (May be offered as a January half-block.) 1 unit  —  Popkin.

SW258: Native Peoples of the Southwest
Provides the fundamental building blocks to understanding the distinctive differences between the major Native Nations of the Southwest including language and culture, respective colonization and resistance experiences, identity and cultural vitality, gender and social roles, and expressive culture and representation. Readings may include ethnographic, ethno-historical, biographical, and linguistic works, as well as critiques of the study of Native peoples by Native scholars. Field Trip Possible. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW265: Immigrant Communities in Colorado
The changing demographics of the Front Range communities in Colorado and the socio-economic conditions that generate poverty will be examined as a case study of immigration theory. The increasing diversity of Colorado Springs, Denver, and Pueblo, due in part to high levels of immigration from Mexico, creates new challenges for this region including the provision of adequate housing and social services and racial and ethnic integration in public schools and other institutions. This community based learning course offers students the opportunity to volunteer with a non-profit organization serving Latino immigrants in one of these cities. Particular emphasis will be placed on student teaching of English as a Second Language classes to recently arrived immigrants. Offered as a combined half block and spring semester extended format course; students must complete both the half block and the spring semester work to receive credit for either. Prerequisite: Spanish Language skills recommended. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) .5 unit.

SW267: History of the Southwest under Spain and Mexico
The pre-contact history of Anasazi and Athabascan peoples from anthropological and mythological perspectives; the causes and consequences of the Spanish entrada and attempts at missionization of the Indian peoples of New Mexico and the California coast; development of mestizo society; the arrival of the Anglo-Americans and the Mexican-American War. No prerequisites. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW268: History of the Southwest since the Mexican War
The adaptation of Native American and Hispanic peoples to Anglo-American culture and politics; the causes and consequences of the loss of Hispanic lands; the evolution of family life and religious practices; indigenous views of modernity. Films, artistic expressions, and works of fiction as well as historical sources. No prerequisites. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW272: Nature, Region and Society of the Southwest
Social and natural science methodological frameworks and approaches to regional studies, centered on the Greater Southwest. Geographic and regional research techniques, including GIS, field methods and air photos. Includes an independent project and off-campus fieldwork. Prerequisite: Required for Southwest Studies majors. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW273: Southwestern Arts & Culture
Introduces interdisciplinary methods of analysis and interpretation in Southwestern expressive media including music, dance, oral literature, drama, visual arts, and material culture. Selected genres and styles of Native American and Latino expression are explored within their cultural and historical contexts. Introduces central issues in Southwestern expressive culture, such as cultural performance, symbolic communication, creativity and social process, acquisition of artistic competence, gender roles, tourism and commodification, authenticity, representation and appropriation, intellectual property rights, and repatriation of expressive media. (Also listed as Race and Ethnic Studies 273.) 1 unit  —  Levine.

SW275: The American Southwest: The Heritage and the Variety
An interdisciplinary and intercultural introduction to the American Southwest: its histories, peoples, cultures, conflicting ethnic demands and common social problems. Through the use of a variety of anthropological, historical, and literary materials, the course examines the major Southwestern cultures in isolation and in relation to one another. Prerequisite: No credit after FS/SW 175. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW280: Topics in Literature: The Nature Essay [with emphasis on writing]

  • Block 1: Topics in Literature: Poet as Witness to War What does it mean for a poet to bear witness in times of war? How do we, at this critical historical juncture, bring forth the images and voices of soldiers, their families, civilian/victims, and protesters-especially when these have been largely circumscribed by the media? We will discuss work produced during the Vietnam war and the current war-work produced by people along the entire political spectrum. We will, hopefully, have visitors who can provide personal testimony. We will look at films. Our final class project will be to produce a class anthology, with each person submitting his or her three or more best poems. Prerequisite: (Writing Intensive). (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as English 286 and Race and Ethnic Studies 200 and Feminist and Gender Studies 280.) 1 unit  —  Martinez.

SW291: Southwest American Indian Music
Music and culture of Southwest American Indians, with emphasis on Pueblo and Athabascan peoples. Considers origin narratives, cosmology, ritual drama, dance, and other aesthetic modes as related to Southwest Indian musical performance. Addresses traditional as well as new music. This course meets the ethnomusicology requirement for the music minor. No prerequisites. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Music 291.) 1 unit  —  Levine.

SW301: Political Ecology of the Southwest
Surveys the geographic, historic, and political diversity of Southwestern livelihoods and cultural strategies. Highlights the struggles and problem solving efforts of local-regional peoples in changing ecological and economic conditions. Uses political ecology as a framework and lens for understanding nature-society problems and solutions. Multi-day-off-campus field trip. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW307: Museums and the Presentation of the Southwest
Examines the role of museums as educational institutions in preserving and presenting cultural products and heritages. Emphasis on the hands-on analysis of artifacts, interpretation of material culture and the presentation of the cultures of the Southwest. (Limited to 16 students.) Prerequisite: Anthropology 111 or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW308: Topics

  • Block 4: Topics: Literature of the Southwest Borderlands, Theory, Song, and Literature This course is an in depth examination of the theoretical and literary productions of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Readings of foundational theorists such as Jose Vasconcelos, Americo Paredes, Octavio Paz, and Gloria Anzaldua will provoke discussions of rapidly evolving concepts of race, gender, and language. Prerequisite: 200 or 300-level lit course in CO, EN, or other literatures or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Comparative Literature 351 and English 380 and Race and Ethnic Studies 380.) 1 unit  —  Padilla.

SW311: Topics in Southwest Studies
An introduction to the geochemical, physical hydrological and biological properties of water systems at the level of a watershed. This course applies principles of physical hydrology, redox, acid-base and solubility chemistry, sampling and experimental design. Includes a significant laboratory component involving GIS and the analysis of samples collected in the field. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW321: Rio Grande: Culture, History and Region
An interdisciplinary course based on history, culture, and water issues. It will explore the cultural heritage and creativity of groups whose historical experience has been shaped by the Rio Grande basin from its origin in Colorado to its mouth in the Gulf of Mexico. The course will engage a broad American and international public in the exploration of how the river basin and the people who live within it change, evolve, and develop together, and can affect each other. Limited to 12 students. Prerequisite: Anthropology 102 or consent of instructor. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Also listed as Anthropology 321 and Race and Ethnic Studies 321.) 2 units  —  Montano.

SW338: Latina/o Literature in the US
S. Comparative study of works of Chicano, Puerto Rican, and Cuban authors, as well as Latin American writers in exile in the United States, including political essays of Marti and Flores Magun and the contemporary works of Hinojosa, Mohr, Laviera, Rivera, Alegra, and Valenzuela. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SW339: Chicano Literature
Critical study of the literary production of authors of Mexican heritage in the United States from 1848 to the present, with emphasis on contemporary Chicano works including Rivera, Anaya, Valdez, El Teatro Campesino, Cisneros, Castillo, and Moraga. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

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Spanish

SP324: Hispanic American Literature
A survey of Hispanic American literature beginning with the pre-Colombian (Inca, Maya and Aztec), and continuing with the Chronicles of the Spanish Conquest, the Baroque and Neoclassical periods and the romantic period which led to independence. Realism and Gaucho literature will also be included. (Offered alternate years.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or Spanish 306. (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

SP326: Contemporary Hispanic American Literature
Poetry, essay, short story and the novel in contemporary Hispanic American literature (1945-2000). Gabriela Mistral, Jorge Luis Borges, Pablo Neruda, Jose Emilio Pacheco, Carlos Fuentes, Cesar Vallejo, Alejo Carpentier, Eduardo Mallea, Ernesto Sabato, Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Elena Poniatowska, Antonio Skarmeta, Ariel Dorfsman and other post-modernist writers will be included from year to year. Prerequisite: Spanish 306. 1 unit  —  Marinescu.

SP338: Latina/o Literature in the United States
Comparative study of works of Chicano, Puerto Rican, and Cuban authors, as well as Latin American writers in exile in the United States, including political essays of Marti and Flores Magun and the contemporary works of Hinojosa, Mohr, Laviera, Rivera, Alegra, and Valenzuela. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or Spanish 306. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) 1 unit  —  Lomas.

SP339: Chicano Literature
Critical study of the literary production of authors of Mexican heritage in the United States from 1848 to the present, with emphasis on contemporary Chicano works including Rivera, Anaya, Valdez, El Teatro Campesino, Cisneros, Castillo, and Moraga. (Offered alternate years.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or Spanish 306. (Meets the Critical Perspectives: Diverse Cultures and Critiques requirement.) (Not offered 2009-10.) 1 unit.

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