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Welcome, Winter Start Students!

Colorado College will welcome 45 Winter Start students, including 18 who were part of the Fall Semester Away program, when New Student Orientation begins on Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. Eight transfer students also will begin in January.

Orientation, which runs through Jan. 20, includes a welcome lunch featuring remarks from CC President Jill Tiefenthaler, sense of community programming, opportunities for community service, and a capstone address by Assistant Professor of English Natanya Pulley, who will discuss this year’s Common Reading selection, “Citizen: An American Lyric,” by Claudia Rankine.

Additionally, Fall Semester Away students will join a re-entry workshop led by Inger Bull, director of international programs at CC, and transfer and exchange students will participate in a question and answer session with Pedro de Araujo, associate dean of the college.

Winter Starts — both first-year and transfer students — also will participate in CC’s signature Priddy Experience trips, in which students spend five days off campus. Students will travel to CC’s Baca campus in the San Luis Valley or Santa Fe, New Mexico, where they will do community service work with non-profit organizations.

Classes begin on Monday, Jan. 22, with new students being enrolled in a double-block introductory course, the First-Year Experience, designed to facilitate the academic transition to CC’s Block Plan.

The first day of each block also features a First Mondays speaker. The Block 5 speaker is Nikole Hannah-Jones, an award-winning investigative reporter for The New York Times Magazine, who will deliver the Martin Luther King Jr. commemorative keynote address. She has spent years chronicling the way official policy has created — and maintains — racial segregation in housing and schools. A 2017 MacArthur Genius Grant Fellow, she has written extensively on the history of racism, school re-segregation and the disarray of hundreds of desegregation orders, as well as the decades-long failure of the federal government to enforce the landmark 1968 Fair Housing Act.